Medliorate

Improving medical students

Informed Consent

Posted by medliorator on April 12, 2008

The questions is: when is it too much information?

My answer is NEVER, but there are many times when I feel like I am really putting the patient off by describing too many “gory” details. For example, when I describe a ureteroscopy with a stent placement to a male patient with a stone, I have to tell him that I am going to place a long thin scope up into his penis, find his ureteral orifice, go up the ureter to find the stone and laser it, then end the procedure by leaving a long plastic tube inside that will span his entire ureter from the kidney to the bladder. Albeit all under general anesthesia, but I can usually see the patient physically wince and cross his legs… and this is even before I go into all the potential risks and complications from the procedure…

But what else can I do? The patients needs to know, and I want them to know. That’s part of practicing medicine in the 21st century. Gone are the paternal days of medicine when the doctor decided what was best for the patient without any questions asked.

Information overload [UroStream]

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