Medliorate

Improving medical students

Improve your Resilience

Posted by medliorator on February 10, 2008

Resilience is the ability to adapt well to stress, adversity, trauma or tragedy. It means that, overall, you remain stable and maintain healthy levels of psychological and physical functioning in the face of disruption or chaos.

  • Get connected. Build strong, positive relationships with family and friends, who can listen to your concerns and offer support. Volunteer or get involved in your community. “A sense of connectedness can sustain you in dark times,” Dr. Creagan notes.
  • Use humor and laughter. Remaining positive or finding humor in distressing or stressful situations doesn’t mean you’re in denial. Humor is a helpful coping mechanism. If you simply can’t find humor in your situation, turn to other sources for a laugh, such as a funny book or movie.
  • Learn from your experiences. Recall how you’ve coped with hardships in the past, either in healthy or unhealthy ways. Build on what helped you through those rough times and don’t repeat actions that didn’t help.
  • Remain hopeful and optimistic… look toward the future, even if it’s just a glimmer of how things might improve. Find something in each day that signals a change for the better. Expect good results.
  • Take care of yourself. Tend to your own needs and feelings, both physically and emotionally. This includes participating in activities and hobbies you enjoy, exercising regularly, getting plenty of sleep, and eating well.
  • Accept and anticipate change. Be flexible. Try not to be so rigid that even minor changes upset you or that you become anxious in the face of uncertainty. Expecting changes to occur makes it easier to adapt to them, tolerate them and even welcome them.
  • Work toward goals. Do something every day that gives you a sense of accomplishment. Even small, everyday goals are important. Having goals helps direct you toward the future.
  • Take action. Don’t just wish your problems would go away or try to ignore them. Instead, figure out what needs to be done, make a plan to do it, and then take action.

Resilience: Build skills to endure hardship [Mayo Clinic]

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